Collegiate Questions

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Steven welcomes Clark State College theatre professor Theresa Lauricella to discuss the results of her raising the Shakespeare Authorship Question to students and colleagues on a community college campus.

**Minor correction from today’s episode - Theresa misspoke when mentioning Constant Pilgrim - the title she was thinking of was A Lover's Complaint!

Speaking Daggers

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Steven welcomes Actor/Writer/Filmmaker and the producer of the show, Jake Lloyd onto the podcast to talk about the nature of the Shakespeare authorship conversation and the social habits the conversation tends to trigger. They read and respond to some listener emails and tweets as well as share their feelings and experiences when discussing Shakespeare authorship.

Let's Grill the Messenger

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Special guest host and international educator, Patricia Carrelli, puts Steven in the hot seat, and asks him about what it is like to direct Shakespeare plays from an Oxfordian position! How does knowledge of the details of Edward de Vere's life that are so deeply reflected in the plays effect the way he directs and works with his actors?

Sacked by the S.A.Q. with Dragon Wagon Podcasters!

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Steven welcomes Actor/Filmmaker Jake Lloyd and Writer/Poet Alexandra Hoey from fellow DWR podcast, Dungeons and Dragon Wagon into the studio on behalf of YOU the listener! Specifically the listener who may be completely new to the Shakespeare Authorship Question (S.A.Q.). Jake and Alexandra pick Steven's brain as true newcomers to the authorship mystery in a casually fun, insightful, and extra long conversation on this week's Don't Quill the Messenger!

It was all Greek to me...

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Master Scholar Earl Showerman, Theater Professor Theresa Lauricella, and Greek Mythology enthusiast and host of the podcast Mythunderstood, Paul Bianchi, discuss Shakespeare's greater Greek and how the author may have had a better understanding of it then we have been led to believe. Influence of the Greek masters can be found throughout the Shakespearean canon.